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  • Gazelle / Bell 206 / Alouette II Purchase and Operating Costs

    Does anyone have an idea of the purchase and operating costs for a standard, first-hand, civvie Gazelle in the 70's?

    I'm also looking for some comparisons with other types like the Bell 206 or the Alouette II.

    Thanks for your help gents!

    Comment


    • Savoia
      Savoia commented
      Editing a comment
      Will make some enquiries Fabrizio.



  • SA342L CN-ACW air-to-air NFI




    Syriac SA342L as seen in November 2021




    SA342M F-MGET (cn.4225) during a live fire exercise NFI (Photo by Patrick Gillis)




    ZU-RNV departure from Wonderboom




    New flight instrument array installed in a South African Gazelle
    in November 2021 (Video courtesy of Avia supporter 'DG')





    Comment




    • SA341B ZB673 (WA1966) as seen at RNAS Culdrose on 12th July 2006 (Photo by Gert Jan Mentink)




      SA341C G-BZDV (WA1150) as seen at Newtownards Airfield on 16th June 2008 (Photo by Gavin)




      Mi-35P's with SA342L's over Cyprus in November 2021 (Photo by Shaun Psaila)




      SA341B XZ334 (WA1673) possibly at Middle Wallop NFI

      Comment




      • SA341G HB-XIL (WA1039) as seen at Grenchen Airport in Switzerland on 25th April 1980

        Presenting this offering of 'XIL' in response to Zis' recent posting of this craft.




        SA341B XX412 (WA1362) as seen at Gilze Kamp Prinsenbosch in the Netherlands on 3rd October 1985
        (Photo by Jonathan Verschuuren)


        Royal Marines Gazelle attached to 3CBAS and seen above during Exercise 'Highland Reprise' 85.





        SA341B ZB671 (WA1958) as seen at Lee-on-Solent on 18th November 2021 (Photo by Graham Tiller)





        Comment




        • SA341B XZ329 (WA1648) as seen at Middle Wallop in 1994 (Photo by Steve Ryle)

          Attached to 670 Squadron.




          The Sharks as seen at RNAS Culdrose in July 1976

          Comment




          • SA341F2 ZU-RNV (cn.1608) as seen at Wonderboom Airport on 19th November 2021




            SA341D ZB625 (WA1905) as seen at Deptford Down on 1st March 2010 (Photo by Chris Wood)




            Gazelles as seen at Dax on 18th November 2021 (Photo by Kell)




            SA342J N624EL (cn.1094) as seen departing
            Issy-les-Moulineaux recently





            Digital Yugo Gaz





            Comment




            • Irish Air Corps SA342L 241 (cn 1854) as seen at Baldonnel in February 2003 (Photo: Michael Kelly)

              Comment


              • Savoia
                Savoia commented
                Editing a comment
                Nice one Zis, always enjoyable to see the IAC Gazelles 👍 and no doubt appreciated by Avia member Joe! ☘️ 🇮🇪 ❤️



            • SA342L1 12905 (cn.115) as seen in Serbia NFI (Photo by Igor Salinger)

              As seen with Mi-35 shadow.




              SA341D XW858 (WA1089) as seen at Middle Wallop on 8th May 1992 (Photo by Ken Videan)

              Now flying as G-ONNE.




              Gazelles as seen in the Excel hangar
              on 20th November 2021


              Aircraft seen include G-CBKD, G-KEMD plus two aircraft being prepared for the Ghana Police.

              Comment


              • Zishelix
                Zishelix commented
                Editing a comment
                It would be more interesting if the cameraman took few wide shots of the hangar's inside instead of this 'artistic' filming

              • Savoia
                Savoia commented
                Editing a comment
                Yes, that would have been better.



            • SA341B G-ZZEL (WA1152) as seen at Ha'penny Green in November 2021 (Photo by Paul Bunch)




              SA342M F-MGCI (cn.4175) as seen at Aérodrome de Millau-Larzac on 17th October 2021 (Photo by Marco Papa)






              Comment




              • The Loss of XW850 and XW851 Control Issues

                The loss of XW850 has been something that has always occupied my mind. At the time it crashed I was an apprentice aircraft technician at Arborfield. I believe the fatality referred to in a previous post was a R.E.M.E trainee on an air experience flight. Somewhere there must be a coroners report. There was certainly an accident report raised, which I saw, however I have been unable to locate a copy.

                Three years later in 1976 I was working at 70(AC) Workshops Middle Wallop. XW851 (sister ship to XW850) was a having major inspection and modification program. I was carrying out inspection work which involved moving the flying controls. During this inspection I became aware of a clunking noise emanating from the main rotor swashplate. The swashplate had excessive wear the details of which are not relevant to the rest of this story.

                However, while moving the controls the cyclic locked solid and could not be moved aft, this was without hydraulic pressure.
                I was startled by this and relaxed the pressure on the cyclic. The restriction disappeared and initially I couldn't recreate it.
                I then attempted to recreate the movement I had made with the cyclic. In effect this was full right cyclic, full forward, left to the centreline of the stick and then full aft.

                The stick jammed solid and was immoveable aft. I called for help as I did not want to let go. Inspection revealed that the cause of the stick jam was the cyclic friction discs. An urgent signal that I saw was sent to all army aviation units to carry out immediate inspections. One of the officers who had been involved in the original accident investigation on XW850 (Major Southon?) came to see the aircraft, he felt that what we had found corresponded to the report submitted by the pilot of XW850. By then XW850 was scrapped therefore no further investigation was possible.

                It is not easy to describe the actual failure, but I will try. Firstly, the aircraft has to have a cyclic friction fitted to the stick (non S.A.S), the amount of cyclic friction applied had an effect as possibly did the amount of friction on the cockpit floor surface.
                As the stick was moved from fully forward to fully aft, the lowest disc contacted the floor and distorted slightly. Either the hole in the disc was too large or the next disc up had an undersized external diameter. The effect was that the edge of the second disc caught on the distorted lip of the lower disc resulting in the controls becoming locked.

                Final Thoughts

                No civil airworthiness directive was ever issued, although civil and military aircraft all came off the same production line. Could this fault be still lying dormant waiting for the right "swiss cheese" conditions to arrive? Yes, as only the British military seem to have been notified. Also, spare parts replacements over the years could reintroduce the problem.

                How Can You Easily Check for the Condition?

                Loosen the friction and gradually move the stick forward. Look down at the cyclic friction discs at the rear of the stick. If you have a half moon/smiley face gap between the lower disc and the next up which you could poke something through, then the potential for a control jam is there.

                Long time ago now, it has always bothered me. I have often wondered if the pilot of XW850 was ever advised of this finding. Might have made him feel a little better.

                Comment


                • Savoia
                  Savoia commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Well done Andy, this is a great post addressing a potentially crucial issue. A more formal welcome awaits you below.

                  I have asked one of our members who currently works on Gazelles (both civilian and military) for his comments.

                • xbdt
                  xbdt commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Regarding the cyclic control, I never heard of a possible problem there but of course everything is possible.

                  Here is an expanded view of the pilot's cyclic friction assembly where the friction is obtained by compressing a series of spring washers (170). These do not move, just compress. The lower part (175) lets call it a cup consists of an upper (A) part and a lower (B) part. Between these two there is another cup serving as dust cap. The neck of part A and part B are glued together in the middle with the cup loose in between. The dust cap is loose at all times.

                  Friction is applied when turning (150) clockwise, friction occurs between the stick and the floor on ball joint bolted onto the floor (210).

                  My interpretation of a possible jam there would be that A and B became loose from each other and that part B gets stuck under the side of part A instead of remaining a one piece component.

                  Part 110 and 120 is the limiter for the adjusting knob (150) it should be set just to release all cyclic friction, not more.

                  If the limiter is loose, the pilot could in fact disassemble the whole friction assembly and also create a possible jam problem there.

                  The co-pilot cyclic stick is also important, always check that the safety ring and clip is properly installed, check also the alignment/secure of the carpet. I had some people sliding the carpet around with their feet, this can also give some strange cyclic inputs :-)




              • Changes of Ownership G-CBKD & G-KEMD

                A couple of changes in the past few days. One of them very exciting for me !

                G-CBKD has been sold by Flying Scout Ltd (Permit expired 15.4.19) to Simon James Leonard Fish, 23.11.21, in the Dunmow, Essex area. It currently has a declaration of no flight. Hopefully the new owner will put her back in the air soon.

                G-KEMD sold by Excel Charter Ltd to Calport Ltd, 22.11.21 and fantastic they are a Perth, Scotland company. After doing a quick search it could be for either Simon Howie or Ross Howie (Butchers trade)

                Comment


                • Savoia
                  Savoia commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Great stuff Elipix! Hopefully your wish of seeing a Gaz back in Scotland may have just moved one step closer to being fulfilled. 👍



              • SA342J(S) G-TOPZ (cn.1473) as seen at Coventry Baginton on 15th July 2008 (Photo by Karl Drage)




                SA432MV F-MGCC (cn.4160) as seen at Aérodrome Sainte-Léocadie in November 2021


                SA342M as seen at Rouvres-En-Woëvre in November 2021

                Comment





                • Dear Andy

                  A warm welcome to Aviafora, we are so glad to have you with us!

                  Some years back we had a member 'Warty' who also shared some memories involving XW850 and which you can read below.

                  I also read your comments on 'Alouettes & Lamas', much appreciated.

                  Regards

                  Savoia



                  Originally posted by Warty View Post

                  XW850 (c/n 1018) which was delivered on the 2nd May 1973 was written off on the 31st of the same month. The cause of the accident was attributed to a jack-stall, which causes the controls to revert from servo to manual, and the cyclic stick to kick to the left. Tricky enough to deal with at the best of times, in this instance it happened at low level and at maximum weight. The aircraft crashed at Fordingbridge, Hampshire and was written off as being damaged beyond repair.

                  XW851, which was delivered on the 19th of June 1973, looks like it was the replacement for the written-off XW850. XW853 was probably a late entry to the IFTU because it wasn't delivered until the 28th of June 1973.

                  XB, could you kindly share your thoughts on Andy's comments about the Gazelle's cyclic friction as per his remarks in post #5290 above.

                  Comment


                  • Welcome to Aviafora, Andy!

                    Many thanks for your valuable info regarding XW850 & 851's control issues.

                    I wonder if you could help explain the purpose of the white-black stripes some UK Gazelles had under the Plexiglas windshield back in 1970's.




                    Comment


                    • Hi Zishelix

                      In a previous post someone commented on an aircraft having aerials in a non standard position on the tailboom for the period.
                      Most equipment fits were trialled on Demonstration and Trials Squadrons aircraft before issue to service. There might be a long delay between trials and fleet installation. Some modifications never making it to squadrons in the field.

                      As to the stripes, I never saw them. I might hazard a guess that as they are directly below the pedals it might be some form of dirt catcher to keep mud from falling into the canopy when operating in the field. Maybe a D&T squadron aircraft. That is a guess!!! I wonder if there any other images as I suspect that is two photos of the same aircraft. Also was it to both sides?

                      Comment


                      • Zishelix
                        Zishelix commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Thanks for your kind reply.

                        Maybe you're right about 'dirt catcher' but I'd say the stripes were applied outside the plexiglas. I found another one image of probably same installation which was on trial machine XW276 #03.



                        Btw, previously showed pics wasn't the same a/c. The upper one is XW851 from late 1970's.

                    • Originally posted by Savoia View Post
                      Dear Andy

                      A warm welcome to Aviafora, we are so glad to have you with us!

                      Regards

                      Savoia
                      Many thanks Savoia.

                      Andy

                      Comment




                      • SA341G N6957 (cn.1060) as seen at Richards Field in Florida on 22nd August 1976 (Photo by Larry Johnson)






                        SA341D G-ONNE (WA1089) as seen at Lee-on-Solent on 25th November 2021 (Photos by Phillip Wilmshurst)



                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Zishelix


                          That last photo does seem to show something on the outside.

                          I wonder if there was an issue with light entering the cockpit from below in certain conditions at night (such as landing on a lit helipad) and whether the intention was to reduce glare? It does look as if it's two attempts to solve the same problem.

                          Yet another guess.

                          Comment


                          • xbdt
                            xbdt commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Or maybe aluminium foil to enhance the antenna ground plane? Just guessing.



                        • SA341B XW900 (WA1195) on the pan at Soest, North Rhine-Westphalia in Germany in 1975


                          And seen post accident in 1976

                          XW900 crashed in Soest on 25th May 1976 during NVG trials.

                          Comment


                          • Savoia
                            Savoia commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Thanks for these shots Andy! 👍

                        • Originally posted by xbdt View Post
                          or maybe aluminium foil to enhance the antenna ground plane? just guessing

                          I was led to believe that it was for shielding the strobe when night flying and near the ground.

                          Andy M = Mike's instructor ????

                          Comment


                          • Fabrice
                            Fabrice commented
                            Editing a comment
                            afaik, the Gazelle's onboard lighting equipment was considered unsuitable for night flying during the initial trials with the IFTU; perhaps there could be a relationship?

                          • AndyM
                            AndyM commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Never been fortunate enough to be an instructor, shortly to retire having spent my career bending spanners mostly on helicopters.
                            Bell 47 to AW 169 and just about everything else in between.



                        • Gazelle Cyclic Control Jamming

                          We are blessed with some wonderful members on Shrieking Gazelles, indeed an entire host of 'Gaz experts' and for whose thoughts and opinions we are very grateful.

                          I am reproducing here the discussion posted earlier this week on the potential for 'cyclic jamming' as raised by our newest member 'Andy M' and also the response from one of our founding members .. XB.


                          Originally posted by AndyM

                          In 1976 I was working at the 70(AC) workshops at Middle Wallop. XW851 (sister ship to XW850) was a having major inspection and modification program. I was carrying out inspection work which involved moving the flying controls. During this inspection I became aware of a clunking noise emanating from the main rotor swashplate. The swashplate had excessive wear the details of which are not relevant to the rest of this story.

                          However, while moving the controls the cyclic locked solid and could not be moved aft, this was without hydraulic pressure.
                          I was startled by this and relaxed the pressure on the cyclic. The restriction disappeared and initially I couldn't recreate it.
                          I then attempted to recreate the movement I had made with the cyclic. In effect this was full right cyclic, full forward, left to the centreline of the stick and then full aft.

                          The stick jammed solid and was immoveable aft. I called for help as I did not want to let go. Inspection revealed that the cause of the stick jam was the cyclic friction discs. An urgent signal that I saw was sent to all army aviation units to carry out immediate inspections. One of the officers who had been involved in the original accident investigation on XW850 (Major Southon?) came to see the aircraft, he felt that what we had found corresponded to the report submitted by the pilot of XW850. By then XW850 was scrapped therefore no further investigation was possible.

                          It is not easy to describe the actual failure, but I will try. Firstly, the aircraft has to have a cyclic friction fitted to the stick (non S.A.S), the amount of cyclic friction applied had an effect as possibly did the amount of friction on the cockpit floor surface.
                          As the stick was moved from fully forward to fully aft, the lowest disc contacted the floor and distorted slightly. Either the hole in the disc was too large or the next disc up had an undersized external diameter. The effect was that the edge of the second disc caught on the distorted lip of the lower disc resulting in the controls becoming locked.

                          No civil airworthiness directive was ever issued, although civil and military aircraft all came off the same production line. Could this fault be still lying dormant waiting for the right "swiss cheese" conditions to arrive? Yes, as only the British military seem to have been notified. Also, spare parts replacements over the years could reintroduce the problem.

                          It is possible to check for this condition by loosening the friction and gradually moving the stick forward. Look down at the cyclic friction discs at the rear of the stick. If you have a half moon/smiley face gap between the lower disc and the next up which you could poke something through, then the potential for a control jam is there.

                          Reply posted by XB

                          Regarding the cyclic control, I never heard of a possible problem there but of course everything is possible.

                          Here is an expanded view of the pilot's cyclic friction assembly where the friction is obtained by compressing a series of spring washers (170). These do not move, just compress. The lower part (175) lets call it a cup consists of an upper (A) part and a lower (B) part. Between these two there is another cup serving as dust cap. The neck of part A and part B are glued together in the middle with the cup loose in between. The dust cap is loose at all times.

                          Friction is applied when turning (150) clockwise, friction occurs between the stick and the floor on ball joint bolted onto the floor (210).

                          My interpretation of a possible jam there would be that A and B became loose from each other and that part B gets stuck under the side of part A instead of remaining a one piece component.

                          Part 110 and 120 is the limiter for the adjusting knob (150) it should be set just to release all cyclic friction, not more.

                          If the limiter is loose, the pilot could in fact disassemble the whole friction assembly and also create a possible jam problem there.

                          The co-pilot cyclic stick is also important, always check that the safety ring and clip is properly installed, check also the alignment/secure of the carpet. I had some people sliding the carpet around with their feet, this can also give some strange cyclic inputs :-)

                          Comment


                          • AndyM
                            AndyM commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Looking at the breakdown and allowing for 44 years of memory distortion. The outside edge of the disc A caught on the inner edge of the disc adjacent to the 175. Disc 175 having distorted under load. Not quite what I said in the original write up, but the drawing makes it clearer many thanks for that XB. So what I found was that the 175 disc contacted the floor/210 distorted under load and disc A then jammed on the raised inner lip of the 175 disc.
                            Last edited by AndyM; 1 week ago.

                          • AndyM
                            AndyM commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Further to the above, in 1982 I was gaining some work experience for a civilian Gazelle type rating at Middle Wallop. In the crew room I picked up a copy of the accident report for XW850 (wish I'd pinched it). I emphasize that what comes next is a 40 year old memory of a document I only read once:

                            'The Gazelle pilot came into close proximity with a Wessex helicopter and took avoiding action. The controls locked and he could not pull out of the subsequent dive with the aircraft crashing.'

                            The investigation could find no evidence that a Wessex was in the area at the time of the accident. I feel that this might possibly have tainted the accident boards view of the pilots evidence. As we know jack stall was cited as probable cause.

                            The control restriction I have described could have been cleared if the pilot had pushed the stick forward. However if you are diving into the ground this would be an unlikely response to the situation. A violent avoiding manoeuvre might well have resulted in the control inputs I describe above and lead to the restriction. My personal opinion is that the pilot did try to avoid another aircraft (maybe not a Wessex) and the controls did lock. Sadly I have no evidence to support this statement.

                            On a more general note, there must be a huge amount of technical information on the Gazelle within what was the Aircraft Technical Support Unit (ATSU) and later Aircraft Branch records. I suppose when the Gazelle finally goes it will all end up in a skip.

                            Ironically the work I described undertaking on XW851 in 1976, included the installation of a hydraulic accumulator to help preclude jack stall. XW851 was D&T aircraft at the time, so I cannot remember if this was a trial modification or if it became a standard fit.

                          • Savoia
                            Savoia commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Fantastic contributions by AndyM and XB, bravo amici! 👌



                        • SA341B ZB671 (WA1958) as seen at SPTA on 25th November 2021 (Photo by Paul)




                          SA341B G-BZYD (WA1648) former XZ329 as seen at Headcorn in early September 2021 (Photo by Callum)




                          SA341G N341GG (cn.1181) as seen at Bex Aérodrome in Switzerland in November 2021 (Photo by Michele Ceresa)




                          SA342M F-MBPD (cn.4067) as seen at Hafr Al-Batin in Saudi Arabia in March 1991 (Photo by T. Laurent)

                          Comment




                          • Cypriot SA342L live fire exercise NFI


                            Royal Marines


                            SA341B XX412 (WA1362) as seen at RNAS Yeovilton on 20th September 2003




                            SA341B XZ292 (WA1502) as seen at Oxford Kidlington in 1991 (Photo by Steve Ryle)



                            SA341F2 N341RD (cn.1501) as seen at Witham Field in Florida on 13th November 2021




                            SA342M sim flight





                            Comment


                            • Gaz Lower Windshield Markings

                              Zishelix wrote:





                              I wonder if you could help explain the purpose of the markings some UK Gazelles had in the lower portion of the Plexiglas windshield back in 1970's?
                              XB replied:

                              This could be aluminium foil to enhance the antenna ground plane? Just guessing.

                              Avia member Reggie W. emailed the following message over the weekend:

                              You are correct, adhesive aluminium foil was used on the outside of the canopy to enhance the antenna ground plane. The early British Army Gazelles all had foil on each side of the canopy, approx 9’’ x12’’ in a rectangular shape, (different from the ground plane shown on the ‘trial’ A/C in the photograph). Three strips of aluminium tape with a one inch fold over to maintain foil to foil contact with each strip/. Each joint was sealed with black adhesive tape; hence the stripe effect.

                              When applying the aluminium foil, it was very difficult not to crease or ripple the foil because of the contour of the Plexiglas; a short round wooden pencil, a piece of cloth and a lot of patience was the answer.

                              Reggie W.

                              Comment


                              • Zishelix
                                Zishelix commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Reggie, much appreciated your kind explanation! Finally to find out the purpose of the 'invasion stripes'

                                Please if you know why such solution didn't become standard for all UK Gazelles?

                            • AH.1 performing a sky ballet

                              Comment


                              • Savoia
                                Savoia commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Taken in June 1990 with the Gaz being from 654 squadron and flown by Bruce Stewart (from what I have come to learn at least).

                            • Good Evening everyone,

                              I hope you are all well!

                              Slightly abnormal request and I'm sure a contradictory one too amongst the Gazelle enthusiast in this chat, however, I'm wondering whether anyone knows whether it's possible to replace the Gazelle's front classic bulb Landing/Searchlight for a bright LED one?
                              If so, does anyone know where this can be done or where I can get one?

                              Kindly
                              Liam Barnes

                              Comment


                              • Savoia
                                Savoia commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Yes, we are all in varying degrees of wellness Liamo grazie!

                                Notwithstanding Stefano's comments below and whether there are regulatory issues to take into account (there always are), I am certain it would be possible to retrofit the Gaz landing lamp with an LED array. As to whether someone has done so already, I am unaware, but hopefully we will find out.

                                I am sure Avia member 'XB' could make one up for you if required.

                            • Originally posted by gazelleflyer1705 View Post
                              Good Evening everyone,

                              I hope you are all well!

                              Slightly abnormal request and I'm sure a contradictory one too amongst the Gazelle enthusiast in this chat, however, I'm wondering whether anyone knows whether it's possible to replace the Gazelle's front classic bulb Landing/Searchlight for a bright LED one?
                              If so, does anyone know where this can be done or where I can get one?

                              Kindly
                              Liam Barnes

                              Liam, your Gazelle has a maintenance schedule that follows the military programme. Firstly you would need to speak to Bruce and see if it’s allowed on an ex-mil cab.

                              The LED lights are very expensive circa £150-200. You can get a Gazelle one for £20 plus postage.

                              Steve

                              Comment


                              • gazelleflyer1705
                                gazelleflyer1705 commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Hello Steve,

                                Thank you very much for your reply!
                                Is this price regarding the landing light bulb or just the nav light replacements, and if so do you have a company name or website link that I could go direct to?

                                I have submitted a request form on (https://www.modstore.aero/modificati...lbs-with-light) as recommended by Zishelix, however unsure if there are any others out there.

                                Kindly,
                                Liam



                            • SA342 Phantom Gaz as seen near St. Petersburg in November 2021




                              SA341B XX378 (WA1258) as seen at RAF Fairford on 19th July 1997 (Photo by Richard Flagg)




                              SA341C XW871 (WA1148) as seen at Biggin Hill in 1983 (Photo by Jon Pumpkin)




                              Main rotor tracking flight from Stapleford in November 2021





                              Gaz modelling decal locator

                              Comment


                              • Jakub Cikhart
                                Jakub Cikhart commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Mind you, Option 1 is not the real Gulf war bird, it is resprayed lookalike...

                            • Originally posted by Savoia View Post
                              Yes, we are all in varying degrees of wellness Liamo grazie!

                              Notwithstanding Stefano's comments below and whether there are regulatory issues to take into account (there always are), I am certain it would be possible to retrofit the Gaz landing lamp with an LED array. As to whether someone has done so already, I am unaware, but hopefully we will find out.

                              I am sure Avia member 'XB' could make one up for you if required.


                              You can just buy them from the aviation LED lamp manufactures, they just fit in.

                              Comment


                              • Savoia
                                Savoia commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Grazie Stefano! 👍

                                Oh well, there you go Liamo, it looks as if a replacement LED fitting for the Gaz landing light may already exist!

                              • Zishelix
                                Zishelix commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Maybe this could be of help

                                https://www.modstore.aero/modificati...lbs-with-light
                                Last edited by Zishelix; 1 week ago.

                              • gazelleflyer1705
                                gazelleflyer1705 commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Thank you Guys!
                                Appreciate the info

                                I went on mod store, however no prices on show... we all know what that means ha ha.

                                Are there any other sites/links?

                                Kindly,
                                Liam



                            • SA341H YU-HCS s/n 066 as seen in Serbia NFI

                              Comment


                              • Savoia
                                Savoia commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Very nice Zis! 👍
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