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  • Yugoslav Air Force SA342L 12901 (cn.111) as seen at Batajnica Air Base in May 1990 (Photo by Urs Baettig)


    Unidentified Gazelle



    I have no information at all about the above photo. Does anyone have any idea as to which airframe this could be?

    Comment


    • Zishelix
      Zishelix commented
      Editing a comment
      I'd say Chinese


    • xbdt
      xbdt commented
      Editing a comment
      This looks like an ex french 342M with the wire strike kit removed. you can still see it had a wire cutter at a certain time as the pitot drain is still pointing backwards.

    • Fabrice
      Fabrice commented
      Editing a comment
      I would say Chinese as well, as the camouflage paint is pretty much the same. The ALAT SA 342Ms all had the original position lights on the fuselage sides removed when they were given the NVG capability, in the mid-90's.



  • SA341B ZU-RLH (WA1600) as seen at Rand Airport in South Africa on 12th March 2021 (Photo by Mark Watson)




    SA341B XX392 (WA1302) as seen at RAF Lossiemouth in May 2004 (Photo by M. Alexander)

    Grazie mille Zis, XB and Fabrizio for your feedback on the Gazelle in maintenance. Chinese it is then!

    Comment




    • Another part of our Gulf War Gazelle fiesta, this time new pic of XX449/J

      Comment


      • Savoia
        Savoia commented
        Editing a comment
        Bravo Jakub! 👍



    • SA342J HA-LFH (cn.1775) as seen at RAF Waddington on 29th June 2012 (Photo by Simon Thomas)




      SA341B ZB691 (WA2006) as seen at SPTA on 26th November 2009 (Photo by Rick Ingham)




      SA342L1 YU-HFF (cn.155) as seen in Serbia NFI




      Unidentified Gazelle in South Africa on 13th March 2021 (Photo by Angelo Picoto)

      Can anyone help identify the unit atop this panel (ie. above the screen display).

      Comment


      • xbdt
        xbdt commented
        Editing a comment
        That is a Garmin 430 probably, I think it is an 341B or 341C.

      • Savoia
        Savoia commented
        Editing a comment
        Grazie XB! 👍

    • Originally posted by Savoia View Post
      Unidentified Gazelle in South Africa on 13th March 2021
      I'd say it's ZU-RLH cabin.

      Comment


      • Savoia
        Savoia commented
        Editing a comment
        Okay grazie Zis! 👍



    • SA341B XZ335 (WA1674) as seen at Middle Wallop on 22nd July 1982 (Photo by Lewis Grant)




      SA341G G-ZLLE (cn.1012) as seen at Stapleford on 1st March 2008 (Photo by Keith Sowter)

      This aircraft is supposed to have been placed on the 'YU' register in July last year, but we do not yet have an ID as to which registration this is.


      Film Gazelles

      I know you like film Gazelles Zis, so you've probably already posted this bird before and in which case you may know here ID:





      I do not recommend painting over the entire roof btw. Having spent years flying around mountains in less than ideal weather, you quickly learn the value of the roof windows when inevitably you find yourself in a valley and needing to perform a 45° turn.

      Comment


      • N341BB

        It's SA341G c/n 1455 N341BB while 'acting' in TV show Max Headroom, War episode back in 1987





        Btw, photo of the same machine while it was N14MT http://www.aviafora.com/forums/forum...=3855#post3855

        Comment


        • Savoia
          Savoia commented
          Editing a comment
          Was sure you would know grazie! 👍


      • Wishing all of our Irish Members and Visitors a very Happy St. Patrick's Day


        SA342L 241 (cn.1854) as seen near Casement-Baldonnel Aerodrome
        in December 2005 (Photo by Frank Grealish)



        A prayer of St. Patrick

        A synopsis of the life of St. Patrick

        Comment


        • Zishelix
          Zishelix commented
          Editing a comment
          Joining Sav's greetings


      • Can anyone clarify what all these numbers etc mean ?

        G-KEMD - AAN No/29577 (Airworthiness Approval Notes) was raised on 16th December 2020 by Excel Charters Ltd and also has MOD No: NPI-1408 National Permit to Fly for issue, It still has a declaration of no Flight issued on 13.11.20

        It seems to be a lengthy process to get anything through the CAA ?

        Comment


        • Savoia
          Savoia commented
          Editing a comment
          I think Stefano may be our best bet in terms of understanding the Permit to Fly processes.



      • N44DQ

        Does anyone have any additional photos of N44DQ? This small & blurry image is the only one I have so far.

        Comment




        • SA341B ZB691 (WA2006) as seen at RNAS Yeovilton in February 2019 (Photo by Liam Toohill)




          SA342L QA04 as seen in Qatar in March 2021




          Gazelles Remain in Mali, West Africa

          ALAT's 4th helicopter regiment (4e RHFS) currently have twelve SA342M Gazelles based in Mali assisting in the fight against armed militants. These aircraft are equipped with HOT anti-tank missiles and 20mm cannons.


          ALAT SA342M's in West Africa
          https://www.arabnews.com/node/438246/%7B%7B

          Comment


          • xbdt
            xbdt commented
            Editing a comment
            yes engine cowling, no nadir antenna, shape of mens hole door is different (not hinged)

          • Tasty
            Tasty commented
            Editing a comment
            And the 20mm gun was only mounted on the 341F2 (in the ALAT)

          • Savoia
            Savoia commented
            Editing a comment
            Merci XB et Julien, tu es des stars! 👍



        • SA341G G-LOYD (cn.1289) as seen at Burton Constable Airfield on 25th August 1986 (Photo by Mark Hall)




          SA342M F-MGEL (cn.4217) with Pumas (Photo by Anthony Pecchi)

          Comment





          • Mini Gaz Meet in Belgium Yesterday

            Some of our Belgian members got together on Thursday and Friday and here are some of the photos:











            Above: N505HA, N341GG, N700SH and N341DT (I think) at Dynali Helicopter in Neville, Belgium on 18th March 2021

            Below: N341GG and N341DT (I think) and at Zomergem in Belgium on 19th March 2021






            With our great thanks to Avia members Arnaud and Kurt for these photos!

            Comment




            • Gazelles in Libya

              See document at https://undocs.org/en/S/2021/229

              Page 312 states:

              "Three SA341 Gazelle light utility helicopters (LUH)
              • ZU-HFV Serial #1797
              • ZU-RNO Serial #WA1999
              • ZU-ROF Serial #1210
              were procured from Fulcrum Holdings Limited (UAE) on 17 June 2019 by Steven John Lodge representing L-6 FZE.

              The purchase price of €1.95M was settled from an Opus Capital Asset FZE bank account. (Relevant documentary evidence is at appendix D). Steven Lodge told the company that the helicopters were to be used in Mozambique."
              ​Copy of part of the deed of sale can be found on page 358 of the same document.

              ZU-ROF was cancelled on sale to Jordan. Registration ZU-HFV was unknown thus far, and c/n 1797 makes it ex ZA728. But that one was thought to be still in storage at Stapleford. Any ideas?

              Comment


              • Zishelix
                Zishelix commented
                Editing a comment
                Jos, thank you very much for sharing these valuable info!

              • Savoia
                Savoia commented
                Editing a comment
                Grazie mille Jos! 👍

                The sale to Jordan was (I am sure) one of the companies supplying mercenary Gazelles.

              • Fabrice
                Fabrice commented
                Editing a comment
                To follow on this interesting story, the six helicopters (Gazelles and Super Pumas) have been flown in an Il-76 from Gaborone, via Luanda, to Benghazi. No idea about what happened afterwards. A link for the French readers:
                https://www.middleeasteye.net/fr/act...es-prince-opus

            • XW890 has seen better days... today exposed at RNAS Yeovilton in December 2020

              Comment








              • SA341F2 N479MM (cn.1384) as seen in Tennessee in March 2021




                The above aircraft is currently for sale in the GazMart


                More NAG's .. (North American Gazelles)


                SA341F2 N383GZ (cn.1383) as seen at San Gabriel Valley Airport on 19th March 2021




                N341DT + 1 approach into Baisy-Thy Airport
                in Walloon Brabant, Belgium on 19th March 2021



                N341DT performing a collective, pedals and cyclic functionality test
                prior to departing Baisy-Thy Airport on 19th March 2021






                Above and below: SA341G ZU-ROO (cn.1301) at Mossel Bay Airport on 21st March 2021




                ZU-ROO hangar roll-out at Mossel Bay Airport on 21st March 2021


                ZU-ROO flight over Mossel Bay on 21st March 2021

                Comment








                • SA341C RA-05708 (WA1045) as seen in Abkhazia on 15th and 17th March 2021




                  SA341F2 with Pumas as seen at Camp de Caylus in Tarn-et-Garonne (Photo by Fabrice Helyan)


                  SA342 panel as seen in Var, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur in March 2021


                  SA342M F-MGEW departing Millau-Larzac Airport on 22nd March 2021




                  SA341H HA-LFN (cn.045) as seen in Hungary in September 2019 (Photo by Zöld Ádám)

                  Can anyone offer some suggestions as to what we are looking at mounted on the skid below the hoist?

                  Comment


                  • Helipixman
                    Helipixman commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Is it a hoist ? could it be a camera ? and a Lidar system ?



                • SA341B XZ315 (WA1596) as seen at Middle Wallop on 22nd July 1982 (Photo by Don Hewins)






                  SA341B RA-05709 (WA1184) as seen refuelling at Motovoy Airfield in Bratsk in Russia on 15th March 2021

                  Photos courtesy of Avia member Kirill!




                  SA341C ZU-HBH (WA1418) as seen at Wonderboom Airport on 19th September 2014

                  Comment




                • SA341B XX444 (WA1248) as seen at RAF Wattisham on 1st April 2018 (Photo by Richard Flagg)




                  SA341G G-GAZA (cn.1187) as seen at Sywell on 31st May 2014 (Photo by Chris Hall)




                  SA341F2 N2MF (cn.1448) as seen at Prescott Regional Airport in Arizona on 23rd March 2021 (Photo by Brian La Fetra)




                  Mozambique Air Force to Receive Two Additional Gazelles

                  In February this year, two ex-UK Army Gazelles were seen at Nacala Airport in Mozambique in Mozambican military colours. They were supplied by Paramount, and it is understood another four were destined to be transferred from the UK to South Africa before making their way to Mozambique or perhaps the Paramount Academy in Polokwane or another African defence force.

                  Africa Intelligence in December last year reported that an agreement between Mozambique and Paramount covers at least 12 Marauder armoured vehicles and four Gazelle helicopters, with the Gazelles to be delivered by February.

                  Fifteen Mozambican pilots were being trained at the Paramount Technical Training Academy based at Polokwane International Airport, Africa Intelligence reported. Burnham Global is also providing training in the operation of the armoured vehicles on the ground in Mozambique, according to the Daily Maverick.

                  On 23 February Paramount and Burnham Global announced a multimillion dollar contract with an African government to provide a range of military training and advisory services. This country is believed to be Mozambique.
                  https://www.defenceweb.co.za/aerospa...re-eased-back/




                  Maintaining British Army Gazelles in Canada

                  Interview with Benn Wathey, Senior BATUS Flight Engineer

                  BATUS Flight is located at the British Army Training Unit Suffield (BATUS) in Alberta, Canada. The Corps operates and maintains five Gazelle AH Mk 1 aircraft; it is the British Army’s sole overseas aviation engineering assignment in which the aircraft are maintained entirely by military engineers. The organisation consists of a 15 permanent staff, including aircrew, engineers and logisticians, which are supplemented with 15-person quarterly rotations of temporary staff from the UK.

                  The Senior Aircraft Engineer role is a Warrant Officer Class 1 Artificer Sergeant Major (WO1 (ASM)) whom, post interview and suitability assessment from the platform Chief Aircraft Engineer (CAE), is delegated engineering authorisations equivalent to those held by an SO2 (Officer Commanding (Major)).


                  Benn Wathey, senior BATUS Flight engineer

                  As the current Senior Aircraft Engineer, I am the custodian of the aircraft and its support equipment, the aircrew flying equipment, logistical operations and associated tooling to support the entire organisation. I am ultimately responsible for, and accountable for, all aviation engineering activities including medical evacuation operations for all exercising troops, BATUS staff, their dependants, Canadian Forces and their families. Additionally, I also oversee the training, assessment and subsequent authorisation of aircrew, ground crew and technicians with engineering and non-engineering authorisations.

                  29 (BATUS) Flight Army Air Corps is the most unique and sought-after assignment in Army aviation. However, as with all units located thousands of miles from UK shores, and especially one operating an aircraft which is well-overdue its out-of-service-date (OSD), it brings with it a series of challenges to navigate, and thus exposing their associative opportunities to exploit.
                  Read more here: https://www.imeche.org/news/news-art...me-environment




                  Operation Helvetic Air Support

                  A Review of the British Army Air Corps’ Support Role to the Police Service of Northern Ireland

                  Operation Banner, the British Army’s peacekeeping mission in Northern Ireland during the conflict widely known as the Troubles, came to an end on July 31, 2007. Having been activated in summer 1969, to restore some form of order in the Province amid an outbreak of serious sectarian violence, it became the longest military campaign in the modern history of the British Army. With the reduction of terrorism in Northern Ireland after the start of a peace process in the mid-1990s, Banner was immediately superseded by a new support role for the British Army, on a greatly reduced scale, to assist the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) in its efforts to deal with continuing, small-scale terrorist activity.

                  The British Army’s support role, which began on August 1, 2007 and continues to this day, goes by the codename Operation Helvetic. According to reports, around 1,300 British service personnel remain stationed in Northern Ireland, with one of the units based there being 5 Regiment Army Air Corps (AAC).


                  SA341B ZB670 (WA1951) as seen over Northern Ireland

                  Today the AAC’s 5 Regiment, which was established on October 1st 1993, is based at Joint Helicopter Command Flying Station Aldergrove, located 18 miles (29km) northwest of Belfast in County Antrim, and comes under the control of Joint Helicopter Command (Northern Ireland) – JHF (NI). The Ministry of Defence states: “The ‘Normalisation Process’ of recent years has led to a gradual reduction in the need for helicopter support and, as of August 1, 2007, JHF (NI) now provides Gazelle and Islander aircraft in support of the Police Service of Northern Ireland and military units.”

                  The primary task of the Gazelles, Islanders and Defenders under Operation Helvetic is Manned Airborne Surveillance (MAS). The PSNI explains: “Other military support required to counter terrorism may, in exceptional circumstances, include a request for air support. There are two circumstances when military Support Helicopters (SH) could be made available: if there is an immediate threat to life under MACA then military may authorise the use of SH free of charge, and deliberate operations involving a period of planning.”

                  The AAC’s 665 Squadron first deployed to Northern Ireland in 1971 as part of Operation Banner, equipped with a mix of Westland Sioux and Scout helicopters. It later operated Gazelles on deployments to the Province. The Gazelle, which first flew in 1967, replaced the Sioux in the surveillance and liaison role in Northern Ireland from 1976, serving with numerous AAC squadrons as well as the Royal Marines’ Commando Brigade Air Squadron (CBAS). With a two-man crew it can carry up to three passengers and is fitted with a variety of cameras and sensors, including thermal-imaging equipment. Gazelles were widely used for aerial surveillance during the Troubles and in support of special forces operations, particularly those of the British Army’s elite 14 Intelligence Company.

                  In 2017 there were press articles suggesting that, as part of UK defence cuts, the British military’s ageing fleet of 34 Gazelles – due to remain in service until 2025 – was to be retired early. However, reports of 5 Regiment’s demise appear to have been premature and, for the moment at least, the future of British Army aviation in Northern Ireland looks secure.
                  Read more here: https://www.keymilitary.com/article/...ic-air-support

                  Comment




                  • G-OGEO Update

                    Recent information indicates that G-OGEO is currently being stored at Stapleford Tawney due to a crack in her gearbox.

                    We are uncertain as to whether a replacement gearbox is imminent or if the aircraft is to remain in storage.

                    I last saw G-OGEO in 2017 stored and under covers.







                    All photos by Helipixman

                    Comment


                    • Savoia
                      Savoia commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Thank you for this update Elipix! 👍

                      Does anyone have an idea on the cost of a new gearbox?

                      Also, can someone suggest some of the likely causes of a cracked gearbox?

                    • xbdt
                      xbdt commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Yes a new gearbox is pretty cheap, only 500k EUR :-)

                    • Savoia
                      Savoia commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Wow! That's some price and an interesting challenge to overcome.

                      Elipix please keep us up-dated.

                  • Originally posted by Savoia View Post
                    Thank you for this update Elipix! 👍

                    Does anyone have an idea on the cost of a new gearbox?

                    Also, can someone suggest some of the likely causes of a cracked gearbox?

                    Maybe it’s not cracked. They can get corrosion at the bottom causing an oil leak and normally it’s not repairable. Gearboxes are not that expensive but this aircraft is a civilian Gazelle and will require calendar life items replaced which will cost more than its eventual selling price.

                    Maybe on a different register it may be cost effective.



                    Originally posted by xbdt View Post
                    yes a new gearbox is pretty cheap, only 500k EUR :-)

                    ​I didn’t mean a new one.

                    Comment


                    • Savoia
                      Savoia commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Grazie Stefano.

                      I was really wondering what might cause a cracked gearbox. That's not usually something you can live with.

                      Although stretched, G-OGEO is a 341 so I'm supposing she could receive any overhauled/used 341 gearbox? This could be the way forward if they want to retain her on the 'G' reg.

                  • F-MBQR

                    A freshly serviced machine with brand new parts performing test flight before re-painting either that or ALAT considered a de-camouflage scheme?

                    Comment


                    • Savoia
                      Savoia commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Nice one Zis! 👍



                  • SA341G(S) G-MANN (cn.1295) as seen at Gloucester Staverton on 16th March 1988 (Photo by Rod Smith)




                    F-MCWF (cn.1090) as seen at Phalsbourg on 30th June 1991




                    SA341B XZ348 (WA1719) as seen at Bristol Airport in 1986 (Photo by Rich Highnett)


                    Zairean Air Force Gazelles


                    Pair of Zairean Air Force Gazelles as seen in Zaire in the early 1980's


                    Zairean Air Force Gazelle as seen in Zaire in the early 1980's




                    Wanted: Mechanical Inspector, AAC Middle Wallop

                    Babcock International are recruiting a Mechanical Inspector to serve as Head of Aircraft Maintenance at Middle Wallop in support of the Army's AH1 Gazelle helicopter operations at Middle Wallop in Hampshire.

                    The successful applicant will be responsible for:
                    • Compliance with all relevant Quality, Health, Safety and Environment regulations for the team and site operations, exercising a duty of care promoting a positive approach towards workplace health and safety.
                    • Undertaking all Gazelle aircraft engineering operations, including forward and component maintenance.
                    • Undertaking all aircraft maintenance activities appropriate to trade and experience.
                    • Supervision and self-supervision of aircraft and component maintenance tasks appropriate to trade boundary and approval.
                    • Completion of all aircraft, component and equipment maintenance and documentation in accordance with published procedures and instructions.
                    Qualifications

                    Accredited Aircraft Apprenticeship, Service (or civilian equivalent) trade training to NVQ level 3 or equivalent with extensive trade experience, which demonstrates the practical and theoretical standards required including experience within an MRP 145 maintenance environment, Gazelle helicopter experience and MoD F700C/GOLDesp experience.
                    https://jobs.babcockinternational.co...8DY/659378501/

                    The closing date for the above post is next Wednesday.

                    Comment




                    • Tunisian Air Force SA341 L61 110 as seen near Tunisia's southern border in January 2019




                      BAGS over Britain NFI




                      SA342M with Puma as seen in Rouen, Normandie on 23rd May 2010

                      Comment





                      • Above: SA341C RA-05708 (WA1045) as seen in Abkhazia on 26th March 2021
                        Below: RA-05708 heli-ski take-off in Abkhazia on 24th March 2021






                        SA341D G-CBKA (WA1746) as seen in Derbyshire on 31st August 2015

                        The above aircraft is currently for sale in the GazMart




                        SA341B ZB691 (WA2006) as seen at Middle Wallop on 7th October 2009 (Photo by Fred Taylor)


                        BAG as seen in Rhodesia in 1979




                        SA342M's as seen at Le Luc Le Cannet in September 2016




                        Jakub, a nice little story for your Desert Storm site.

                        At 04:25 on 2nd August, 90 helicopters of the Iraqi Army Aviation Corps (IrAAC) with 900 Republican Guard special forces aboard took off from Umm Qasr. Their two objectives were to secure the Mutlaa Ridge & infiltrate Dasman Palace in Kuwait City, to kill or capture the Emir.

                        The IrAAC operation was an egregious calamity. Unlike RGFC ground forces, the IrAAC was not informed of the invasion until midnight on 2nd August. Iraqi pilots had barely trained to fly at night & suffered from a severe lack of night vision equipment.


                        KAF-504 in Kuwait

                        The IrAAC lost 40 helicopters during the invasion, half of which were a result of accidents or mishaps on the part of the pilots. Helicopters crashed into power lines, into each other or plunged into the ground as a result of being disoriented in the featureless desert night.

                        Eighteen helicopters were shot down at Mutlaa Ridge by two Kuwaiti Air Force Mirages. In Kuwait City, nine helicopters were claimed by an I-HAWK SAM protecting the capital with 5 more shot down by KAF Mirage jets from Ali al Salem airbase. Nevertheless, about 16 Iraqi helos landed safely, deploying their troops into Dasman Palace.

                        The Emir, most of his family and the Kuwaiti Cabinet escaped into a convoy of limousines with moments to spare. The convoy drove at speed to Ali al Salem to a waiting KAF SA.342 Gazelle helicopter which then evacuated them to the safety of Saudi Arabia. This same Gazelle piloted by Lt-Col Fayez ar-Rasheedi, who had earlier shot down an Iraqi helicopter at al-Dourmi, returned to al Salem to continue the fight.

                        Comment




                        • British Gazelles: Status Report

                          Here is the current status of the G- Registered Gazelles (according to official data)

                          There are 40 Gazelles Currently G- Registered...

                          4 are Aerospatiale and none of them have a current CofA

                          That leaves 36 permit aircraft.... only 16 have current permits which leaves 20 either stored or being restored to flying condition ?

                          Comment


                          • Savoia
                            Savoia commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Grazie Elipix, so much appreciated! 👍



                        • SA341B RA-05709 (WA1184) as seen at Mostovoy Airfield near Bratsk in Russia in mid-March 2021

                          709 seen here with heli-dog 'Krasnyy' meaning 'Red' in Russian.
                          With our thanks to Avia member Kirill for this lovely photo!

                          To see more rotary canines, visit Heli-Dogs.




                          SA342M F-MAEC (cn.4216) as seen at RAF Fairford in 1999 (Photo by Gerry Rudman)




                          SA341B XZ345 (WA1705) as seen at Middle Wallop on 7th October 2009 (Photo by Fred Taylor)

                          Comment




                          • WA341B ZA776 of 4 Regiment AAC in southern Iraq 2003 during Operation TELIC 2 (Photo: Dave Liddle)

                            Comment


                            • Savoia
                              Savoia commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Very nice Zis! 👍



                          • SA341D G-RBIL (WA1199) as seen at Perth Scone Airport on 30th March 2021 (Photo by Wallace Shackleton)


                            SA341B ZA731 (WA1800) as seen at Calgary International Airport on 30th March 2021

                            Possibly arriving from the UK after deep maintenance.




                            SA341C XX436 G-ZZLE (WA1402) as seen at RAF Waddington on 6th July 2013 (Photo by Colin Norris)




                            SA341D G-BXTH (WA1120) as seen at Brampton in Cumbria on 27th September 2012 (Photo by David Ambridge)

                            Comment




                            • Soko made HN-42M GAMA capability, educational film. Title: 'Light combat helicopters in anti-armour warfare'


                              Comment

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