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Shrieking Gazelles

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  • Zishelix
    started a topic Shrieking Gazelles

    Shrieking Gazelles


    This thread is for the appreciation of the SA.341/342 series Gazelle helicopters of which I am an enthusiast.

    Over the years I have collected a considerable amount of material relating to Gazelles, some of which I will be pleased to share here with those who are interested.

    I will be happy to discuss anything relating to the history of the Gazelle (now almost almost 50 years old) as well as anything and everything relating to its operations around the world. I hope to meet other Gazelle enthusiasts along the way!

    Finally, the Gazelle produces a unique sound as a result of a harmonisation which occurs between the fenestron and the main rotor blades. This effect is sometimes known as "shrieking."

  • Savoia
    replied


    SA341G JA9098 (cn.1012) as seen at Osaka International Airport on 10th October 1985

    New shots of Japan's modest Gazelle fleet are a rarity making this lovely shot of Toho Air Service's '098' a real treat.

    098 did of course have a sister ship known as JA9164 .. which went on to become N505HA.




    SA341G N505HA (cn.1022) as seen recently in Belgium

    N505HA .. rebuilt !!

    Leave a comment:


  • Savoia
    replied

    Gazelle History

    Some interesting Gaz history taken from the conversations above:

    Sav wrote: Does anyone know what the protrusions are which seem to be mounted roughly halfway along the main blade?
    Fabrice replied: A lot of different main rotor blades have been tested on the SA 340-001, as plastic blades were then a complete novelty; when SA 340-002 took to the air for its maiden flight, she had additional weights placed at mid-span of the main blades. We could imagine that such a device was also tested with the 001.
    Sav responded: This is very interesting Fabrice, as weights are typically used near the hub, usually as some type of damper. I wonder if they were concerned with rotor inertia for purposes of autorotation when it came to the plastic blades and therefore installed these an an initial precaution?

    SA340-001 (the first Gazelle) seen fitted with mid-span blade weights (Photo from the Helipix Collection)

    Anyone with any further thoughts or suggestions?

    Leave a comment:


  • Savoia
    commented on 's reply
    Grazie Elipix!

  • Savoia
    commented on 's reply
    Nice info Elipix.

    I posted some rare shots from Netheravon recently and it would be nice to get some images from Soest. I think we've posted one or two from Detmold and Coypool.

  • Savoia
    commented on 's reply
    This is very interesting Fabrice, as weights are typically used near the hub, usually as some type of damper.

    I wonder if they were concerned with rotor inertia for purposes of autorotation when it came to the plastic blades and therefore installed these an an initial precaution?

  • Fabrice
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks for the link, good to see this good old Puma still soldiering on!

  • Fabrice
    commented on 's reply
    A lot of different main rotor blades have been tested on the SA 340-001, as plastic blades were then a complete novelty; when SA 340-002 took to the air for its maiden flight, she had additionnal weights placed at mid-span of the main blades. We could imagine that such a device was also tested with the 001.

  • Helipixman
    replied

    27.5.20

    G-BZYD Ripe > Private site Near Tadworth, Surrey and then did a local flight around Leatherhead/Ashtead area and later on flew back to Ripe.

    Leave a comment:


  • Helipixman
    replied
    Just found an interesting article about the early use of the Gazelle in the Army Air Corps around 1975

    AAC 660 Squadron (Soest) XW892 XW893 XW896 XW897 XW899

    AAC 661 Squadron (Detmold) XW904 XW908 XW909 XW911 XW913 XX373

    AAC 667 Squadron (Netheravon) 2 Flight : XW905 XX370 XX372 XX375 XX378 XX379

    3 CBAS (Coypool) XW912 XX376 XX377 XX380 XX381 XX390 XX392 XX393

    GCF (Gazelle Conversion Flight) - (Middle Wallop) XW869/A XW885/B XW888/C XW889/D XW903/E

    D & T Squadron (Development & Trials) - (Middle Wallop) XW847 XW849 XW851

    Leave a comment:


  • Savoia
    replied
    Gazelle for Niger




    SA342M F-MMHG (cn.3547) probably Marignane, possibly January 2020 (Photos by Alexandre Dubath)


    SA342M F-MMHG (cn.3547) as seen at Marignane on 9th January 2020 (Photo by Hervé Dermoune)

    This Gaz was evidently destined for Niger.




    SA342L arrives in Lebanon from the UAE in 2007




    SA341H 12631 (cn.1202) as seen near Podgorica (Photo by Menso van Westrhenen)


    For Fabrice: Have you seen this Puma video?

    Leave a comment:


  • Savoia
    commented on 's reply
    It is possible of course that there was a head change 'and' an ECU change!

  • Helipixman
    commented on 's reply
    Looks like a head change but you never know with the UK military they have strange ways of doing things !

  • Helipixman
    commented on 's reply
    I think Egypt had 91 Gazelles !

    4 x SA342K for Air Force
    12 x SA342L for Army
    75 x SA342L for Air Force

    How many were built by the Arab British Helicopter Company at Helwan, Egypt ?

  • Savoia
    commented on 's reply
    Ciao Stefano! I am not at all sure whether this is an ECU change, but that was the note attached to this photo. Your reasoning makes sense though.

  • md600driver
    replied
    Originally posted by Savoia View Post

    ECU change on British Gazelle during Operation Granby 1991

    Are you sure they are changing the ECU? You don’t normally take off the 'A' frame when changing ECU, but you do when you're changing the head and there’s another head next to the aircraft.


    Leave a comment:


  • Savoia
    replied


    SA342M HA-HSG (cn.3615) as seen at Troutbeck Airfield in Cumbria in May 2020 (perhaps 23rd or 24th)




    SA341G(S) G-OGAZ (cn.1274) as seen in Perth on 8th August 2009 (Photo by Robert Henderson)

    From her days in Scottie!




    SA342M F-MGOB as seen at Le Luc Le Cannet on 21st July 2013 (Photo by Rob Schleiffert)




    SA341F2 N341RD (cn.1501) ex-FMBDC as seen in Florida in 2018




    Libyan Gazelles: The Backstory

    The 20 private military contractors (PMCs) who were evacuated from war-torn Libya aboard two Malta-leased RIBs and to Valletta, were aviation experts getting ready to operate assault helicopters, MaltaToday has learnt.

    A full list of names in this newspaper’s possession clearly shows the men who arrived at the Valletta seaport on the Manta-1 rigid inflatable boat on 3 July were not oil and gas personnel, but PMCs with evident military experience.

    The men were released from their arrest by police two days after the Maltese company that leased them the two RIBs, Sovereign Charters, accepted to pay a €15,000 fine for immigration irregularities.

    Now police investigators have learned that the men were specialist pilots engaged to operate six utility and support helicopters, to be armed for “assault and interdiction operations”; as well as seacraft from Malta with maritime interdiction capability to target the sea supply route for weapons from Turkey to the Government of National Accord (GNA) in Tripoli.

    They included team leader Steven Hodge, a pilot; and pilots Travis Maki of geosciences firm Bridgeporth, Ryan Hogan, and Matthew Coughlin; Andrew Furness was identified as the helicopter loadmaster in the mission; other PMCs were South Africans Sean Baker, a medic, Hendrik Bam, Christian Du Preez, Andre Greyvenstein, Gilliam and Joseph Joubert, Rudi Koekemoer, Quintan Paul, Lucas Schutte and Abel Smit; Britons Michael Allen, David Button, coxswains Sean Callaghan Louw and Andrew Scott Ritchie, a former Royal Marines commando, and Australian Richard Parish.

    Business connections

    The two RIBs were leased by James Fenech’s Sovereign Charterers to UAE firm Opus Capital Asset FZE, whose managing director Amanda Perry is the company secretary of Lancaster 6 Limited, a Malta company – as well as managing director of UAE firm Lancaster6 DMCC and CEO of L-6 FZE.

    Lancaster 6 is owned by former Australian fighter pilot and sometime Malta resident Christiaan Durrant, a former associate of Blackwater founder Erik Prince.

    Fenech is now the subject of a criminal case in which he is charged with breaching EU sanctions on Libya. Durrant is the CEO of the BVI-registered company L6 Group Holdings, which ultimately owns Lancaster 6.
    https://www.maltatoday.com.mt/news/n...n#.Xsywe2gzbIU

    The men were released from their arrest by police two days after the Maltese company that leased them the two RIBs, Sovereign Charters, accepted to pay a €15,000 fine for immigration irregularities.
    Yes of course, because after all people traversing the Mediterranean in little boats from Africa and landing without permission in Europe really is unacceptable .. and dangerous too.

    Hypocrites!

    Meanwhile .. further East

    Egypt is looking to upgrade and refurbish 43 of its AH-64D Apache attack helicopters to AH-64E standard under a deal that could be worth $2.3 billion. The US State Department approved the possible foreign military sale on 7 May and notified Congress the same day.

    Egypt is a big user of the Apache, with 46 AH-64Ds in service. Its attack helicopter force also includes 46 Kamov Ka-52s received from Russia and it recently emerged that Egypt is operating a small number of Mi-24 attack helicopters.

    These add to its fleet of roughly 60 surviving Gazelle helicopters armed with HOT anti-tank missiles. Egypt has been keen to diversify its procurement sources since the 2013-2014 temporary freeze in weapons deliveries from the United States following a military coup.
    https://defense.info/partners-corner...pter-upgrades/

    Egypt has 60 Gazelles?

    Last edited by Savoia; 1 day ago.

    Leave a comment:


  • Savoia
    commented on 's reply
    Super shots 𝗘𝗟𝗜𝗣𝗜𝗫 grazie mille! 👍

    Does anyone know what the protrusions are which seem to be mounted roughly halfway along the main blade?

  • Savoia
    commented on 's reply
    Grazie mille Jos. You are welcome to post the photo when it is available.

  • Savoia
    commented on 's reply
    '𝘼 𝙬𝙤𝙣𝙙𝙚𝙧𝙛𝙪𝙡 𝙖𝙘𝙩𝙞𝙤𝙣 𝙥𝙝𝙤𝙩𝙤𝙜𝙧𝙖𝙥𝙝 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙤𝙣𝙚 𝙩𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙮𝙤𝙪 𝙩𝙬𝙤 𝙣𝙖𝙪𝙜𝙝𝙩𝙮 𝙗𝙤𝙮𝙨 𝙝𝙖𝙫𝙚 𝙠𝙚𝙥𝙩 𝙝𝙞𝙙𝙙𝙚𝙣 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙝𝙤𝙬 𝙢𝙖𝙣𝙮 𝙮𝙚𝙖𝙧𝙨?' — According to my email records (Zis may be able to confirm) .. 8 years. 😁 Zis was waiting for it to enter the public domain (which it now has) while I was waiting to post on 'Shrieking Gazelles II' (coming 'soon' [hopefully next year] to a forum near you).

    It is as you say, a wonderful action shot, perhaps one of the best ever.

  • Helipixman
    replied


    In the beginning there was an SA340 c/n 001 registered F-WOFH to F-BOFH to F-WOFH to F-ZWRF

    Various sources quote the c/n changing to 01 (including the wonderful Rotorspot) when did this happen, because I cannot see any photographic evidence that it did, unless someone knows different?

    A selection of photographs below show the changes and in all the examples the c/n remains 001 on the helicopter. In fact, the last photo shows the crude way in which they changed the 340 to 349z just by adding a curve to the 0.











    All photos from the Helipixman Collection

    Leave a comment:


  • Rotorspot
    replied


    Another Egyptian Gazelle Identified

    The following identity has been noted from a picture: Egyptian SA342L, serial 3369, is c/n 1714.

    Leave a comment:


  • Helipixman
    commented on 's reply
    A wonderful action photograph and one that you two naughty boys have kept hidden for how many years ?

    It is always great to see new photos for the first time.

  • Savoia
    replied


    Cypriot Air Force SA342L during live fire exercise




    ECU change on British Gazelle during Operation Granby 1991

    For Jakub.




    Gaz lift during Operation Barkhane in May 2020

    During the above Gaz lift, the blades were loaded in the rear of the chook.




    SA341F F-MBDB (cn.1092) at Dax Seyresse Airport in 1986 (Photo by Christian Malcros)




    SA341D G-EZZL (WA1104) as seen at Duxford on 21st June 2019 (Christopher Murkin)

    Leave a comment:


  • Zishelix
    commented on 's reply
    Indeed, I was waiting until the photo appear in public domain first
    https://twitter.com/Heliquip/status/...747973/photo/1

  • Savoia
    commented on 's reply
    Ciao Zis! I think we've both had this image in our 'private' collections for many years, but it now seems to have entered the public domain.

    Peter Piggott (Heliquip's founder and owner) is a real gentleman and was very kind to me at the beginning of my career.

  • Zishelix
    replied


    ZS-HYI was delivered to Heliquip in 1972, used also as Radio 702 Traffic Report/Patrol.

    Leave a comment:


  • Savoia
    commented on 's reply
    Zis .. there seem to be quite a number of images 'out' on this page?

  • Savoia
    commented on 's reply
    Grazie mille Fabrice!

  • Savoia
    replied


    SA342L (cn.1854) ZU-RZR as seen in Gauteng Province, South Africa in May 2020 (Photo by Simon McDonnell)




    SA341B ZB678 (WA1979) as seen at Manchester Barton on 27th June 2015 (Photo by Roger Lockwood)




    Electric mini Tiger Gaz

    Leave a comment:

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